Zenfolio | Jack Burton Photography | Daffodil labourers and pollution, and uncovered gems from a woodland exploration.

Daffodil labourers and pollution, and uncovered gems from a woodland exploration.

March 01, 2018  •  Leave a Comment

Taking a break from my university work and in need of fresh air, I headed out for a short stroll to what myself and Ben (aka caravan buddy) call the ‘deer field’; a 2-minute commute from the caravan. Instead of deer, though, I instead saw daffodil labourers polluting the land, as mentioned in a previous blog post. Here’s a picture I published on a recent blog of the significant residue:

Obviously, there were no deer around with some 20 folk working away in the adjacent field. I watch them as they stripped elastic bands off the ends of the daffodils and proceed to plant away.

I confronted the man who was handing out baskets of daffodils to the labourers, thinking he might be the farmer or a person in charge of the group. I asked if the group were intending to pick the elastic bands up. To this, he responded: ‘what elastic bands?’. I pointed out the pollution on the floor on which we were standing, and then he claimed that they were removed after they had done the planting.

Obviously, that would be no logical or devised way of doing things: it would double their time of labour! Why not just put the elastic bands in a pocket or back in the baskets in the first place? Also, Ben and I have seen the remnants of the elastic bands intentionally left across all the surrounding fields weeks after the labourers have finished.

As a follow-up, Ben phoned the farmer responsible for the daffodil monoculture, and apparently, the elastic bands are biodegradable. We remain sceptical and will be following up on the claims made if we find anything amiss.

 

Moving on…

 

Having no luck with my deer endeavour, I headed somewhere I had been intending to explore for a while: a patch of woodland on the other side of a nearby patch of scrubland. It was a bit swampy at first, but I managed to find an established path that lead deeper into the environment.

It was a beautiful patch of wood, although contained some sad sights of felled trees: trees that had been old growth on which could still be seen life sprouting and growing amongst all its dendritic features.

It was silent. Some small birds flickering amongst the canopy but not much else. Instead of searching for wildlife I took an interest in the life of the trees themselves. Noticing profoundly interesting shapes that I might often overlook.

It was a quiet, bliss and self-reflecting walk. I came across a bunch of moss spores, sprouting prolifically from a thick and vibrant moss bed beneath an oak tree. I spent a while taking pictures of this micro landscape.

As I proceeded along a different track, on my way out of the woods, I was stunned and surprised to come across another badger set. It was less than a year ago I came across my first badger set, but now I’d found another - less than a mile from each other! This one is closer to the caravan and probably responsible for the animals visiting the fields behind us (evident from the holes they make to leave their poo in).

 

I realised then the importance of exploring every bit of your local environment, with nature you can never expect to see nothing of interest.

 

 


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